Comparing and Translating International Crochet Terms

The difference between UK, Australian and US terminology can be really frustrating for both experienced and beginner crocheters. It can lead to inaccurate gauges (or projects, if you didn’t test it. Don’t ask how I know about this!) or a finished object that just doesn’t look like the picture.

Here’s a table to help compare the terms used in British English, American English, and Danish. I’ve included the international symbol, which is fairly consistent, and a reminder of how to form the stitch. This won’t replace learning the stitches, but it can act as a ‘cheat sheet’ when you are stuck.

To work out the difference, you first need to know what terms the designer has used in the pattern. It’s probably fair to say that most of the patterns you find online are from designers in the US, or use US terms (from personal experience, I didn’t count).

1. Have a detailed look at the pattern and website, magazine or book. You might find information on the pattern itself, or perhaps the designer talks about where she lives, or you may be able to find out where the book was published.

2. Look at the picture. Can you see the rows clearly?

3. Look at the pattern. Does the depth of stitch make sense? How many turning chains are used? That can indicate the length of stitch being used within the pattern.

4. Ask the designer or in a forum like crochetville if it’s something you really want to make. If you can’t find the answer, it must be confusing someone else, too.

 

International Symbol US term UK / Aust term Danish Uh? Do What?

chain

chain

(ch)

chain

(ch)

Luftmaske

(Lm)

Hook under thread, pull through loop on hook

slipstitch

slip stitch

(sl st)

slip stitch

(sl st)

Kaedemaske

(Km)

Hook into work, YO, pull through loop and work

single

single crochet

(sc)

double crochet

(dc)

Fastmaske

(fm)

Hook into work, YO, pull thorugh work, YO, pull through 2 loops

hdc

half double crochet

(hdc)

half treble crochet

(htr)

Halvstangmaske

(hstm)

YO, hook into work, YO, pull through work, YO, pull through 3 loops

double

double crochet

(dc)

treble crochet

(tr)

stangmaske

(stm)

YO, hook into work, YO, pull through work, YO, pull through 2 loops, YO, pull through 2 loops

treble

treble crochet

(tr)

double treble crochet

(dtr)

Dobbelt stangmaske

(Dblt stm)

YO twice, hook into the work, YO, pull through work, *YO, pull through 2 loops* three times

doubletreble

double treble crochet

(dtr)

triple treble crochet

(ttr)

Tredobbelt stangmaske

(tredblt stm)

YO three times, hook into work, YO, pull through work, *YO, pull through 2 loops* 4 times

2 thoughts on “Comparing and Translating International Crochet Terms”

  1. I am interested in learning to crochet. I am a beginner and would like details of your classes in September such as where they are being held. I did see you in hobbycraft once and it was interesting.

    1. Hi Linda, I include my classes on the calendar, but I’ve sent you more details in an email. Some classes are for beginners, others are aimed at people who can already knit, but want to know how to follow a pattern to complete projects using crochet. If you want to know anything else, feel free to drop me an email.

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